Dubendorf Air Force Center museum

 

 

On Saturday May 23rd, 2009 I had a brief opportunity to visit the 'Flieger Flab museum', which is located near Zurich, in Switzerland.
Inside two large halls, an interesting collection is on display. The aircraft collection is considerable but care has been taken to make the museum not too crowded. A number of aircraft have been hung on the ceiling, while others have been placed in periodic setting or with mannequins bringing the aircraft more 'alive'.
Ju-Air has three Junkers Ju.52s and one was doing brisk business, performing 3 flights while I was there in the morning.
I hope my photos of the aircraft I found on display will encourage others to visit this air museum.

 

Nieuport 28C-1, 607
Nieuport 28C-1, 607

 

Dubendorf air museum
Bleriot XI
Häfeli DH-1 (replica), 245
Häfeli DH-1 (replica), 245
Häfeli DH-1 (replica), 245
Häfeli DH-1 (1916-1919), 245

The Häfeli DH-1 was an 1910s Swiss two-seat reconnaissance aircraft, built by the aircraft department of the Federal Construction Works (Eidgenössische Konstruktions-Werkstätte, K+W) at Thun, Switzerland.
The DH-1 was a three-bay biplane of wood and fabric construction, it had a fuselage pod with tandem seating for the two-man crew and twin booms mounting the tail.
Six DH-1s were built during 1916 but within a year three had been destroyed in accidents. The survivors were withdrawn from service in 1919 and scrapped. [Wikipedia]

 

Häfeli DH-3
Häfeli DH-3
Häfeli DH-3
Häfeli DH-3
Bu131B, A-51
Bücker Bu131B, A-51

Following the poor performance of the DH-2, August Häfeli designed an improved version the Häfeli DH-3. It was basically the same airframe as the DH-2, the upper wing had a cut-out to give a greater field-of-fire for the pivoted machine-gun. It was a two-bay of wood and fabric construction, powered by a 120 hp (89 kW) Argus As II water-cooled inline engine.
On 8 January 1919 a DH-3 inaugurated the firsts Swiss air mail service between Zurich and Berne. A DH-3 aircraft failed a structural test in 1923 which caused the DH-3 to be withdrawn from service. The DH-3a following modification remained in service until 1939. [Wikipedia]

 

Häfeli DH-5 (replica), 459
Häfeli DH-5 (replica), 459

The Häfeli DH-5 was a 1910s Swiss two-seat reconnaissance aircraft, built by the aircraft department of the Federal Construction Works (Eidgenössische Konstruktions-Werkstätte, K + W) at Thun, Switzerland.
The DH-5 was a single-bay biplane of wood and fabric construction. The aircraft was powered by a 180 hp (134 kW) LFW I engine produced by the Swiss Locomotive and Machine Works. Test flying of the prototype commenced in March 1919 and 39 were ordered. A second batch of 20 aircraft were powered by a 200 hp (149 kW) LFW II engine. A further batch of 20 aircraft designated the DH-5A used the LFW III engine.
The DH-5 entered service in 1922 and were not withdrawn from service until 1940. [Wikipedia]

 


The workshop, with obviously a propellor in its final stages of restoration (or a full replica).

 

EKW C35, 180
EKW C35,
180
EKW C35, 180
EKW C35,
180
Fokker D.VII (partial replica), 640
Fokker D.VII
(partial replica), 640

 

Hispano-Suiza HS-57 engine

 

Fokker C.VE, 331
Fokker C.VE, 331
Fokker C.VE, 331
Fokker C.VE, 331
Messerschmitt Bf-109E-3, J-355
Messerschmitt Bf-109E-3, J-355

 

Dewoitine D27, 257

Dewoitine D-27, 257 (fighter aircraft 1931 - 1944)

Constructions Aéronautiques Émile Dewoitine was a French aircraft manufacturer established by Émile Dewoitine at Toulouse in October 1920.
The company was liquidated in January 1927, with the only remaining active programme (the D.27) being transferred to EKW in Switzerland.
The company was re-established in Paris in March the following year as Société Aéronautique Française (Avions Dewoitine) or SAF. After briefly continuing D.27 production, the reconstituted firm produced a range of fighters that became a mainstay of the French airforce during the 1930s, the D.500 family.
The firm was nationalised in March 1937 into the short-lived SNCA du Midi or SNCAM, and produced the D.520 as France's best-performing fighter at the outbreak of war, albeit in too small numbers to pose any serious opposition to the Luftwaffe in the Battle of France.
The final end of Dewoitine as a recognisable entity was its absorption into SNCASE in December 1940.
[Wikipedia]

 

 

Hanriot HD-1, 653


Hanriot HD-1, 653

The Hanriot HD.1 was a French World War I single seat fighter. Rejected for service with French squadrons in favour of the SPAD S.7,[1] the type was supplied to the Belgians and the Italians with whom it proved highly successful. 831 of a total production of about 1200 were in fact produced by Italian companies under licence.
On the power of its 110 hp Le Rhone rotary it was not outstandingly fast, but it was very manoeverable and proved popular with pilots as a safe and pleasant aircraft to fly.
The type was also produced by the Nieuport-Macchi company of Varese, Italy, which built almost 900 HD.1s between 1917 and 1919, more than the parent firm. [Wikipedia]

 


EFE C.3603-1,
C-534
Morane-Saulnier MS.406C-1, J-276
Morane-Saulnier MS.406C-1,
J-276
North American P-51D Mustang, J-2113
North American P-51D Mustang,
J-2113

Aéroplanes Morane-Saulnier is a French aircraft manufacturer formed by Raymond Saulnier(1881-1964) and the Morane Brothers Leon(1885-1918) & Robert(1886-1968) in October 1911. The company was taken over and diversified in the 1960s. [Wikipedia]

 

Fieseler Fi-156C-3 Storch, A-100 Fieseler Fi-156C-3 Storch, A-100

 


Bücker Bu-181B-1 Bestmann,
A-251
Messerschmitt Bf-108B-2 Taifun, A-209
Messerschmitt Bf-108B-2 Taifun,
A-209
UH-12B, KAB-202
UH-12B,
KAB-202

Bücker-Flugzeugbau GmbH was a German aircraft manufacturer founded in 1932. It was most notable for Its highly regarded sports planes which went on to be used as trainers by the Luftwaffe during World War II.
The company was founded by Carl Bücker, who had served as an officer in the German Navy during World War I and then spent some years in Sweden establishing the Svenska Aero factory. With the sale of this business at the end of 1932, Bücker returned to his native Germany where he opened his new factory in Johannisthal, Berlin in 1934.
Bücker's three great successes were the Bücker Bü 131 Jungmann (1934), the Bü 133 Jungmeister (1936) and the Bü 181 Bestmann (1939). As well as these, the company built designs from several other manufacturers under licence, including the Focke-Wulf Fw 44, the DFS 230, and components for the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, Junkers Ju 87, and Henschel Hs 293.
At the end of World War II, the company’s premises fell into the Soviet occupation zone, and were seized. The company was then broken up.
The Bü 181 continued to be built in Czechoslovakia and Egypt after the war. [Wikipedia]

 

Allouette II, 23
SO 1221S Djinn, 23, equipped for ambulance & rescue services

 

Nord 1203 Norecrin, HB-HOI
Nord 1203 Norecrin, HB-HOI

 


De Havilland DH.100 Vampire FB.6,
J-1153
Pilatus P2-06, U-134
Pilatus P2-06,
U-134
Twin Beech HB-GAC
Beech G18S,
HB-GAC

Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. is an aircraft manufacturer located in Stans, Switzerland.
The company was established in 1939, but it was not until 1944 that a Pilatus-built aircraft, the SB-2 Pelican, first took to the air. Soon after, in 1945, Pilatus started producing the P-2 trainer for the Swiss Air Force, of which 54 were built.
[Wikipedia]

 

Beech 18 / C-45
Beech G18S "Twin Beech" HB-GAC c/n 8434.
(For existing 'Twin Beeches' in Europe, see census at OldProps)

Bob Parmerter, aviation historian with specialty interest in the Beech 18, has serious doubts about the identity as given above; he wrote me the following:
"In reviewing the history of HB-GAC at the Swiss Transportation Museum
I found several incorrect c/n's quoted. Your picture in the page for 'Dubendorf Air Force Center museum' quotes it as a G18S c/n 8434 (as does Old Props) while several other references note it as c/n 8343. I believe that neither is correct...
> C/n 8434 became N8039H and was for many years was at Duffy Aircraft> Parts in Denver.
> C/n 8343 went to the Italian AF in 1949 as MM61644 & displayed at> Ditellandia Aqua Park in '97.

I believe that it is C18S c/n 8362:

This Beech C-45F has the following previous identities & history: USAAF 44-87103 Compl 10Apr45 & delivered to New York. Crated &> departed 09Jun45 for AAF in Karachi.
On the 30Apr47 USAAF in Europe census (probably stored). To Foreign Liquidation Commission (FLC), to Aland Braithwaite, Hotel Plaza-Athenee, Paris on 15Jul48 registered as NC79848.
Modified to C18S, with a Beech civil conversion kit, on 06Aug48 by Airwork General Trading Co. Ltd., Heston, UK. Completely overhauled by them on 19Aug49. Rene S. McCall, Charlotte, NC on 19Mar51 as N79848 for $15,000.
Bought by Swedish national 17May51, it was cancelled by CAA on 18May51 as exported to Sweden. Reg’d SE-BTS 29Jun51 to AB Kvallstidningen Expressen, Stockholm for newspaper distribution & executive flights. Registration canx 29Jan52.
Swiss Air Force as B-8 ‘52 to ‘57. Swiss Federal Air Office for National Topography as HB-GAC May57 and jointly operated with the Swiss Air Force.
Sold as scrap to Berner AG, St. Gall in 1969 for use in a playground (didn’t happen).
Sold in Jul72 to Honcoop Trading Co, Veen, Holland who sold it to O. Trottman, Zurich. Was rebuilt in 1972 and based in Berne in ‘74.
Donated to the the Swiss Transportation Museum in ‘80. Still there in 2010.

Source(s): FAA file for NC79848, AAF aircraft record card and several other sources.
I'm not sure what the Museum quotes for a c/n but can't seem to find a contact for the Museum..."
Bob

Taigh Ramey wrote in response 21Mar2011:
"I just visited the museum and the Beech in Dubendorf, Switzerland yesterday! I was told that this Beech has significant history in Swiss Aviation, as the photos taken from it were instrumental in the aerial mapping of the Alps.
It is a great looking stock 'C'-model Beech and is complete with 2D30 counterweight non feathering props, spinners and even desert air filters.
The airframe has interesting modifications, including a large camera and view port mounted in the aft cabin that shoots straight downward.
There is a set of windows in the belly just aft of the pitot tubes that look like the pilot and copilot can sight through. They must have corresponding ports in the cockpit floorboards. I can even see the fuel lines through these windows...
The right side escape hatch looks to have been converted to a full window. There is a rectangular opening in the main cabin door presumably for oblique shots similar to the SNB-5P/RC-45J."


 

Pilatus Pc-3-02, A-801
Pilatus PC-3-02, A-801
Pilatus P2-06, U-134
Pilatus P2-06, U-134
Nord 1203 Norecrin, HB-HOI
Nord 1203 Norecrin, HB-HOI

 

De Havilland DH.112 Venom FB.4, J-1753
De Havilland DH.112 Venom FB.4, J-1753

The de Havilland DH.112 Venom was a British postwar single-engined jet aircraft developed from the de Havilland Vampire.[2] It served with the Royal Air Force as a single-seat fighter-bomber and two-seat night fighter.
The Venom was an interim between the first generation of British jet fighters – straight-wing aircraft powered by centrifugal flow engines such as the Gloster Meteor and the Vampire – and later swept wing, axial flow-engined designs such as the Hawker Hunter and de Havilland Sea Vixen. [Wikipedia]

 


D-101, a remotely piloted vehicle
Pilatus PC-7, A-901
Pilatus PC-7, A-901
EFE C.3605, C-497
EFE C.3605, C-497

 

FFA P.16, X-HB-VAD
Flug- und Fahrzeugwerke (FFA) P.16 Mk.III (Prototype), X-HB-VAD

Flug- und Fahrzeugwerke Altenrhein AG (FFA) was a Swiss aircraft and railroad car manufacturing company based at Altenrhein. It was originally part of Dornier Flugzeugwerke, but was split off in 1948. Flug- und Fahrzeugwerke means "aircraft and vehicle works" in German.
In the years following World War II, FFA manufactured fighter aircraft for the Swiss Air Force, based on Morane-Saulnier designs as the D-3803. These were eventually replaced in service by surplus P-51 Mustangs.
In the 1950s, FFA developed two jet fighters, the N-20 'Aiguillon' and the P-16. The N-20 was cancelled after its first flight in 1951. The P-16 project, while promising, was cancelled after two crashes, and Hawker Hunters were bought instead.
The firm licence-built many aircraft for Swiss use, including the de Havilland Vampire, de Havilland Venom, Pilatus P-3, Dassault Mirage III, and F-5 Tiger.
In 1987, the company was bought back by Dornier. [Wikipedia]

FFA P.16, X-HB-VAD
FFA P.16, X-HB-VAD
FFA P.16, X-HB-VAD

 

EFE N-20 Aiguillon
EFE N-20 (Prototype, STOL capabilities) 'Aiguillon'

 

 


A lot of wood was used to manufacture the Vampire
U-1224, De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.55
De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.55, U-1224
U-1224, De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.55
De Havilland DH.115 Vampire T.55, U-1224

 


Heavy rocket power
Allouette II, V-49
Allouette II, V-49
Allouette II, V-49
Allouette II, V-49

 

A-713, Beech E.50
Beech E.50 'Twin Bonanza', A-713

 


DH-112 and its firepower

Mirage IIIS and jet engine
Mirage IIIS, J-2335
Mirage IIIS, J-2335

 

 

Hawker Hunter F.58A J-4152
Hawker Hunter F.58A J-4152
Hawker Hunter F.58A J-4152
Hawker Hunter F.58A J-4152
Hawker Hunter F.58A J-4152
Hawker Hunter F.58A J-4152

 


Hawker Hunter F.58, J-4001

 


EFE C.3605 "Schlepp", C-497

'Schlepp'...

Bücker Bü 133C Jungmeister, U-61

 

Ju.52 I was pleasantly surprised to see Ju.52/3mg3e HB-HOP, of Ju-Air, arrive from a scenic flight!
It made 2 more flights (at least) that beautiful sunny day and I was allowed on the ramp to photograph its second arrival (all I had time for on this occasion).

 


The Junkers Ju 52 (nicknamed Tante Ju - "Auntie Ju" - and "Iron Annie") was a German transport aircraft manufactured from 1932 to 1945. It saw both civilian and military service during the 1930s and 1940s. In a civilian role, it flew with over 12 air carriers including Swissair and Lufthansa as an airliner and freight hauler. In a military role, it flew with the Luftwaffe as a troop and cargo transport and briefly as a medium bomber. The Ju 52 continued in postwar service with military and civilian air fleets well into the 1980s. [Wikipedia]


HB-HOP taxies past while in the background sit CASA 352L HB-HOY (top right) and Junkers 52 3mg/3e HB-HOS
HB-HOY is due for retirement in 2012, so it seems they cannot be made to fly indefinitely: let us enjoy while we can!

 

Ju.52/3mg3e, HB-HOP of Ju-Air

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airworthy_Ju_52

 

Ju.52/3mg3e, HB-HOP
Junker 52/3mg3e, HB-HOP
Junker 52/3mg3e, HB-HOP

 


De Havilland DH.100 Vampire FB.6, J-1126

 

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Useful links:
Air Force Center, Dubendorf, Switzerland
www.PaulNann.com
www.aviationmuseum.eu

 


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Created: 06-Jun-2009