MONINO,
CENTRAL RUSSIAN AIR FORCE MUSEUM

APRIL 19th, 2011

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum


Monino houses the Air Force Academy, which had for many years collected equipment and aircraft. The decision to set up a formal museum came about on 23Nov1958, by the decree of the Commander of the Soviet Air Force, Marshal K.A.Vershin.
For many years access was restricted, as the museum was part of the military establishment. In the last few years a seperate entrance has been constructed enabling foreigners to visit the impressive collection without months of often difficult negotiations.

Significant fighters are a Lavochkin La-7 flown by three times 'Hero of the Soviet Union' Kozhedub and a Yak-9U, obtained from Bulgaria and restored by the Yakovlev design buereau.
The famous IL-2 is represented by an example recovered from a crash site in 1977 and rebuilt by the Ilyushin bureau.
A fairly recent arrival is a Bell Kingcobra.

Just after the end of hostilities a display of World War II aircraft was staged in Moscow and rumours abounded about the fate of the machines. Some people believed that they were placed in store and the emergence of the P-63 and the Douglas A-20G Havoc lend credence to this. An American warbird collector told me that over 100 aircraft from WW2 are stored in a military establishment near Moscow. If this is true then hopefully more will appear at museums in Russia.

The museum has also acquired the remains of a number of missing types from crash sites and more locations are being investigated.

Central Russian Air Force Museum
Tel.: 095-526-3327 Fax: 095-526-3351
Admission Tuesday-Wednesday Friday-Saturday 0930-1300 1415-1700; Saturday 0930-1400 [sic]
Location: about 30km east of Moscow at the Air War Academy, off Road M7.

[Source:
Aviation Museums and Collections of Mainland Europe
-2nd Edition, 2009 by Bob Ogden & Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd]

 

PROPLINERS AND WARBIRDS

 

Monino Air Force Museum
One can hardly miss the looming Antonov An-22 'Antei' CCCP-09334 (c/n 00340209)

The Antonov An-22 Antei (Ukrainian and Russian: ????? Antaeus; NATO reporting name 'Cock') was the world's heaviest aircraft, until the advent of the American C-5 Galaxy and later the Soviet An-124. Powered by four pairs of contra-rotating turboprops, the design remains the world's largest turboprop-powered aircraft. It first appeared outside the Soviet Union at the 1965 Paris Air Show.
Wikipedia, more...

Here is my report of a rare An-22 visit to Amsterdam IAP in april 2003 and may 2007

 

Monino Air Force Museum
Monino Air Force Museum
Monino Air Force Museum
The Tupolev Tu-4, which is a copy of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress.

Monino Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-4, 01 (c/n 2805103)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Monino Russian Air Force Museum

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Antonov An-12BP, 04 (c/n 8900203)

The Antonov An-12 (NATO reporting name: Cub) is a four-engined turboprop transport aircraft designed in the Soviet Union. It is the military version of the Antonov An-10.
Wikipedia, more...

The Middle East and Central Asia was for a long time the scene for this rugged workhorse. Here is a report on my 2000 visit to Sharjah, U.A.E.

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Antonov An-8, 10 (c/n 9340504)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
The rare Antonov An-10 'Ukrania', CCCP-11213.
Tthe passenger-configured An-10 became much less successful than the freighter An-12, which is still much in use.

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Three excellent Antonov designs in a row

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Antonov An-24 CCCP-46746 (c/n 47300903)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Beriev Be-12 , 25 (c/n 4600302)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
The Beriev Be-12 Chayka ("Seagull", NATO reporting name: 'Mail') is a Soviet twin-turboprop-powered amphibious anti-submarine and maritime patrol aircraft. Remarkable shape and form; here is more information on Wikipedia.

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
The enormously impressive Tupolev Tu-114 CCCP-L5611

The Tupolev Tu-114 Rossiya (Russian: Ty????? ?y-114 Pocc??) (NATO reporting name Cleat) is a turboprop powered long-range airliner designed by the Tupolev design bureau and built in the USSR from May 1955.[1] The aircraft was the largest and fastest passenger plane at that time (until the advent of the Vickers VC10) and also had the longest range (10,900 km). It has held the official title of fastest propeller-driven aircraft since 1960.
Due to its wing and powerplant design, the Tu-114 was able to travel at speeds typical of modern jetliners (880 km/h). Able to accommodate 224 passengers, a more usual number in Aeroflot service was 170 provided with sleeping berths and a dining lounge. In 14 years of civilian service, the Tu-114 was noted for its very high level of safety and reliability, and carried over six million passengers before being replaced by the jet-powered Il-62.
Wikipedia, more...

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Lisunov Li-2T (Douglas DC-3 modified) CCCP-93914 (c/n 23440808)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
CCCP-93914 (c/n 23440808)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Ilyushin IL-12T, 10 (c/n 30218)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Lisunov Li-2VP (Douglas DC-3 modified), 12 (c/n 18418809 ?)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Douglas A-20G 'Havoc', 14 (ex/ 43-10052, 310052)

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
North American NA-100 (B-25D) Mitchell, 50
It seems that the B-25 Mitchell bomber was actually based here at Monino for some time during W.W.II

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Beriev Be-32 CCCP-67209

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Antonov An-14A, 01 (c/n 500303)


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BIG BOMBERS & OTHER HEAVIES

The outside park contains examples of most of the types which the Air Force has used in recent years along with several prototypes. The Tupolev Tu-4, which is a copy of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress, contrasts with the Tu-22M which formed the backbone of the long range bombing force in recent years.
The collection includes a number of airliners used by Aeroflot on both internal and international services.

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-16K-26, 53
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-16R-2, 50

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-22B 'Blinder'

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Myasichev 3MD 'Bison', 30

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Myasichev 3MD 'Bison', 30
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-22M 'Backfire', 33
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-128A 'Fiddler', 0
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-16K-26, 53

MONINO RUSSIAN AIR FORCE MUSEUM - 2011

Monino Russian Air Force Center
Myasishchev M-50, 12

Although built only in prototype form, this design by Myasishchev was an extremely advanced turbojet-powered bomber with supersonic flight capability. In configuration, the Myasishchev M-50, codenamed 'Bounder' by NATO, had a shoulder-mounted cropped delta-wing, a conventional tail unit with all-swept surfaces, and landing gear comprising retractable tandem main units mounted on the fuselage centre line, each with a four-wheel bogie; while retractable outrigger balancing struts, each with two wheels, were mounted near the wingtips.
The slender area-ruled fuselage provided pressurised accommodation for a crew of three and incorporated a large weapons bay.
Power was provided by four wing-mounted Soloviev D-15 turbo-jets of 13000kg thrust in underwing pods.
First flight of the M-50 is thought to have taken place in 1957, and the last of several prototypes, re-designated M-52, took part in the Soviet Aviation Day fly-past in 1961.
With the two re-heated outer engines relocated to the wing tips, the M-52 was powered by four Kolesov ND-7F or VD-7F turbojets, with an afterburning thrust of 18145kg. Considered formidable by the West, the M-52 was estimated to be capable of Mach 1.83 or 1950km/h at optimum altitude.

Source: www.aviastar.org/air/russia/mjas_m-50.php


MONINO RUSSIAN AIR FORCE MUSEUM - 2011
This extraordinary aircraft is the Sukhoi T-4, a Russian attempt to emulate the USAF XB-70 Valkyrie mach-3 bomber. 

MONINO RUSSIAN AIR FORCE MUSEUM - 2011

MONINO RUSSIAN AIR FORCE MUSEUM - 2011


 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

The Bartini Beriev VVA-14 vertical take-off amphibious aircraft was developed in the Soviet Union during the 1970s.
Designed to be able to take-off from the water and fly at high speed over long distances, It was to make true flights at high altitude, but also have the capability of 'flying' efficiently just above the sea surface, using ground effect.
The VVA-14 was designed by Robert Bartini in answer to a perceived requirement to destroy United States Navy Polaris missile submarines.
After Bartini's death in 1974, the project slowed and eventually drew to a close, the aircraft having conducted 107 flights, with a total flight time of 103 hours.
The only remaining VVA-14, No. 19172, was retired to the Russian Federation Central Air Force Museum, Monino in 1987. The aircraft still resides at the museum in a dismantled state, where it carries the number '10687' and 'Aeroflot'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartini_Beriev_VVA-14

A.J. Galama sent me this link, which shows many photos of this amazing aircraft in a 'walk around'.

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JET AIRLINERS

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev Tu-144S, CCCP-77106

1968 and the Soviets had caught up with Concorde. The prototype was nearly ready to fly and there would be extensive overtime before the first flight in order to ensure they were flying before Concorde. 31Dec1968 saw the first test flight. Tupolev and his sons were present as the graceful monster took to the skies and made three passes over the airfield before landing.
However, the shape and grace of the aircraft was unmistakably copied from the West, and the aircraft was soon nicknamed "Konkordski". Although it was instantly recognisable as a copy, an exact copy could not be made by the Soviets as they didn't possess the necessary technology, had different measurementts, screws and bolts. The Soviets could only follow the characteristics of the design, "building around" the pieces they couldn't copy. However, the wing design was wrong and the design didn't create lift and stability through the speed ranges and so when the Tu -144 was shown off at the Paris airshow in 1973, canard foreplanes had been added to just aft of the cockpit.

At the Paris airshow of 1973, the Tu-144 was said to be cleaner and faster than Concorde ands certainly was bigger. On the third day of the show it was time for the two supersonic aircraft to duel against each other in the sky - a battle of the displays. Concorde flew first and performed a breathtaking display of the sort that we are now accustomed to from the big white wonder. Whilst on the runway, the pilot of the Konkordski was told that he now had only half the time in which to perform his display, his time had been cut. The Tu-144 took off and climbed to 4 000 feet - suddenly there was a violent change in the pitch of the aircraft and it fell out of the sky, the aircraft broke up at 1 500 feet and feel onto the nearby village. All six crew and several civilians died from the accident.

Source: http://tu144.tripod.com/history.html more...

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Yak-40K, CCCP-87490

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Yak 40K, CCCP-97490

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Yak-42, CCCP-42302

 


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FIGHTER AIRCRAFT

 

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Ilyushin Il-10M 'Beast'

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Ilyushin IL-28
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Ilyushin IL-28
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Monino Russian Air Force Museum

MORE FIGHTER AIRCRAFT PHOTOS ON MY FLICKR WEBSITE

 


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The display of engines, models, armaments, photographs and uniforms was housed in 1930s buildings where the story of Soviet military aviation was portrayed in detail. Alongside was a hangar with the early aircraft on show. Sadly these were recently burned down and although the aircraft there had been moved out, a great deal of archive material was lost.
License examples of a Farman HF-4 and a Voisin L show the French influence of this period. The Sopwith Triplane could have been built at the Duks factory or may be one purchased in Britain in 1917.Two light aircraft on show here are the Tupolev ANT-2 of 1924 and the 1926 Buryvestnik S-2.
Andrei Tupolvev built his ANT-1 in 1922 and the ANT-2 was the first all metal aircraft produced in the country. Many examples of the famous designer's work can be seen in the outside park.
The S-3, powered by a Harley-Davidson motor cycle engine, was reluctant to fly. Replicas of a Polykarpov I-16, a MiG-3 and a Bereznyak-Isayev BI, the first rocket-powered fighter in the world, are on show.
[Aviation Museums and Collections of Mainland Europe -2nd Edition, 2009 by Bob Ogden & Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd]

NOTE- While I have tried my best to identify the aircraft by their correct types, I had to resort to different websites for this and not all photos were as clear as I would have wished. Corrections or comments can be emailed to me, for email link see bottom page. Thank you.


HANGAR A

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

In May 1924 the first ANT-2 was built and 26 May the aircraft piloted by test-pilot N.I.Petrov took-off for the first time. The prototype was tested till April, 1925. According to the tests results it was decided to produce five machines at Kolchuginsk Plant.
Production aircraft designated as ANT-2 bis was equipped by 200 HP engines and was intended to carry 3 persons. Since the DB was overloaded with deployment of ANT-3 (R-3) serial production, it was not possible to produce five ANT-2bis a/c. In 1930 only one machine ANT-2bis was built.
Reconnaissance aircraft projecr on the basis of ANT-2 was not embodied. Restaurated ANT-2 is displayed in Monino Air Force Museum.
Source:
www.tupolev.ru/English/Show.asp?SectionID=162

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev ANT-2

Monino Russian Air Force Museum



Three old hangars are used by the museum, two for display purposes and one for storage.
Replicas of two famous aircraft are on show in these buildings. These are Sikorsky Ilya Muromets built for a film and a Tupolev ANT-25. Also in this area are a number of interesting light aircraft including the unconvential Sukhanov Diskplans.

Another remarkable aircraft is the bright blue Sopwith Triplane.
Only two authentic Sopwith Triplanes remain in existence. N5912 was one of three aircraft built by Oakley & Co. Ltd. and delivered in late 1917. The aircraft saw no combat service and instead served with No.2 School of Aerial Fighting and Gunnery at Marske. Today, N5912 is preserved at the RAF Museum, Hendon.
N5486 was supplied to the Russian Government for evaluation in May 1917. In Russia, the aircraft was fitted with skis and used operationally until captured by the Bolshevists. The aircraft then served in the Red Air Force, probably as a trainer, and was rebuilt many times. Today, N5486 is preserved at the Central Air Force Museum, Monino, Russia [Wikipedia]

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Sikorsky S-22 Il'ya Muromets (replica)
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Sopwith Triplane
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Voisin LAS (replica)
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Information on the Voisin LAS (a.o.)
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Sopwith Triplane and Ilya Muromets

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
It is nice to see they have included some information in English too.
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
ANT-40

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Turbolet
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Tupolev ANT-25/RD, URSS-N025 [INFO]
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Vyugov Aist-2, CCCP-06
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Farman IV

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
The glider is a Kazan KAI-19M, with in the background Sportine Aviacija LAK-9M Lietuva, CCCP-408


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HANGAR B

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Polikarpov Po-2
Monino Russian Air Force Museum

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Ilyushin Il-2 Shturmovik
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Ilyushin Il-2 Shturmovik
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Information on the Yak-9U
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Yak-9U [INFO]
>Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Yak-9U
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Bell P-63A Kingcobra, 42-69775 / 91
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Lavochkin La-7
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Lavochkin La-7
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Polikarpov I-15
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Polikarpov I-16
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Petlyakov Pe-2
Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Petlyakov Pe-2

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
MiG-3

 

 

 

WEIRD & WONDERFUL

Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Most peculiar, a jet-engined biplane: the PZL-Mielec M-15-01 Belphegor, CCCP-15105 (c/n 1S013-01)


Monino Russian Air Force Museum
Mil V-12 'Homer'

The Mil V-12 (also referred to as the Mi-12, NATO:'Homer') is the largest helicopter ever built. The name 'Mi-12' would have been the name for the production helicopter. Since the V-12 never went into production and only two prototypes were built, the name 'Mi-12' was never adopted.
Development came about as a need for a heavy lift helicopter capable of carrying major missile components.[2] Production began on the V-12 prototype in 1965 with the goal of lifting no less than 30,000 kg.
The first prototype made its first lift-off on 27 June 1967.
In May-June 1971 the first prototype V-12 SSSR-21142 made a series of flights over Europe being topped by the participation in the 29th Paris Air Show at Le Bourget wearing exhibit code H-833.
Despite all of these achievements the Soviet Air Force refused to accept the helicopter for state acceptance trials for many reasons, the main one being the fact that the initial purpose for which V-12 had been developed no longer existed, i.e., the rapid deployment of strategic ballistic missiles.
All development on the V-12 was stopped in 1974. The first prototype remained at the Mikhail Leontyevich Mil helicopter plant in Panki-Tomilino, Lyuberetsky District near Moscow and (still there today? 5540'2?N 3755'56?E? / ?55.66722N 37.93222E? / 55.66722; 37.93222). The second prototype was donated to Monino Air Force Museum for public display.

[Wikipedia, more...]

 

Monino Russian Air Force Museum

 

Ian Comleys noticed I hadn't photographed all the planes on display here and sent me below images which I compiled into one.
The fierce, cold wind blowing, and an uncomfortable condition on my fee,t restricted me somewhat; normally I have no problem crossing fences for a better photo, but this day I did not consider it even.
The photo shows Ilyushin IL-18V CCCP-75737 (c/n 181002702), plus (top) Tupolev Tu-104A, 46 and the burned Tupolev Tu-124, CCCP-45025.
Photos by Ian Comleys
Comparing other websites I noticed a few other aircraft missing, which may have been in the storage hangar undergoing restoration (hopefully!)

 

 

LINKS:

MORE PHOTOS BY ME, TAKEN AT MONINO DURING THIS VISIT, ON MY FLICKR.COM WEBSITE

www.moninoaviation.com
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monino
www.richard-seaman.com/Aircraft/Museums/Monino/Highlights/index.html
easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~samolet/index.html
www.ausairpower.net/APA-Monino-A.html
www.aviationmuseum.eu/World/Europe/Russia/Monino/Russian_Air_Force_Museum.htm
svsm.org/gallery/monino-family
www.pbase.com/jortega/russia_air_museum&page=1
http://website.lineone.net/~paul_nelhams/moninolog.html
http://www.michaelprophet.com/Monino_museum.html
aerial view in april 2009: http://www.airliners.net/photo//1548938/M/
(If you find any of these links to be 'dead', please email me and I will either correct it or remove it. Yhank you for your help.)

Aviation Museums and Collections of Mainland Europe -2nd Edition, 2009 by Bob Ogden & Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd:

PAGE ONE + PAGE 2

Thanks to our guide Svetlana and driver Oleg, from www.moscow-cityguide.com, for arranging this visit and getting us out here in the 'boondocks'!

 

 

 

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Created: 26-april-2011