Bournemouth aviation museum
22Sep2013


Photos © Ruud Leeuw

Bournemouth aviation museum
I was in fact looking for a particular plane parked at the airport, but unable to find it while driving around, so I decided to ask at the aviation museum and this warranted a quick visit to see what is on display here.

Bournemouth aviation museum
What remains of Vickers Vickers Viscount G-OPAS, which owned by/operated for BEA, Cambrian Airways, British Air Ferries, Occidental Oil, Panavia Air Cargo, British World Airlines who registered it as G-OPAS. Before then, since its fist flight 06Mar1958 it has been registered G-AOYN. In 1997 it was broken up and moved to Duxford. Been with this museum since 2007.

Bournemouth aviation museum
Forward fuselage of Vickers Viscount, next to those of a British Electric Lightning and Canberra.

Bournemouth aviation museum
The remains of Avro Vulcan B.2MRR XH537 peeps over the hedge and is visible from the road B3073.

Bournemouth aviation museum
WS776 was built from a batch of 100 Meteor NF.14s manufactured by Armstrong Whitworth at Baginton in Coventry.

Bournemouth aviation museum
Hawker Hunter XG160 was built by Armstrong Whitworth at Coventry and delivered to the RAF in August 1956.

Bournemouth aviation museum
SEPECAT Jaguar GR1 XX763

Bournemouth aviation museum
deHavilland Vampire T11 XE856

Bournemouth aviation museum
Cockpit of the Vampire.

The aircraft was initially operated by 226 Operational Conversion Unit (OCU) at Stradishall and was then transferred to the Station Flight at RAF North Weald; her final operational posting was with number 219 Squadron at Driffield.
At the end of her operational career XE856 was sold 30th October 67 to Hawker Siddeley Aviation at Hawarden. She was moved around to a number of locations starting at St. Athan then to Chester, Woodford, Welwyn Garden City, Lasham, Long Marston, Catfoss, and finally Henlow where it was intended that she would be restored to flying condition.

As part of the intended restoration process XE856 was registered to Dusk till Dawn Aviation (the motto of 219 Sqn) as G-DUSK on 1st February 1999. The aircraft arrived (in parts) at Bournemouth Aviation Museum on 6th September 2005 where it was intended the restoration would commence, however the project did not come to fruition and the aircraft was sold to Bournemouth Aviation Museum.

Bournemouth aviation museum
Hunting Percival P.56 Provost T.1 WW421.
The prototype Provost first flew on 24Feb1950, with an initial order for 200 placed by the RAF twelve months later. First deliveries were made in the summer of 1953 and production for the RAF continued until the spring of 1956.

Bournemouth aviation museum
North American Texan / Harvard 'KF488'.
Reconstruction of the Museum's Harvard commenced in 2000, being built up from a collection of parts from various sources. The rear fuselage is ex-RAF, the fin ex-Royal Navy, another part was marked as a US Navy SNJ and the wings are ex Italian!
As such, it is being repainted as KF388 to represent what is perceived as the most substantial part of the fuselage and one of the many Harvards that served with the RAF.

Bournemouth aviation museum

One of the most well known training aircraft, the Texan was developed by North American Aviation in California from its BT-9 trainer of 1935. The sturdy, all metal Texan featured improvements to make it more representative of fighters then in use with the US Army Air Corps, the main difference being the fitting of a retractable undercarriage. The large cockpit gave an excellent view for pilot and trainee, and the 550 hp Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine gave fighter like performance. Its direct drive propeller with near supersonic tip speed gave the Texan a distinctive rasping note. Designated AT-6 (Advance Trainer) by the USAAC, production was additionally undertaken from 1940 in the North American factory in Dallas, which also produced the Texan for the US Navy under the designation SNJ.

Of the 16,000 built until 1945, many thousands remained in service with the USAF, who instigated a major rebuilding programme to update about 2000 of the trainers as T-6G Texans, with many being delivered to 'US friendly' countries. These rebuilds were undertaken both by North American and Noorduyn. The RAF had 1000 Harvards at the end of the war, and the finals ones remained in service until 1955. Many USAF, RAF and RCAF aircraft were to spend many more flying years with air forces in all parts of the world, with South Africa - the last major user - keeping their Harvards in service until 1998.

Many Texans / Harvards are still flying today in the hands of enthusiasts as low cost 'warbirds', and can still be seen actively flown at air shows around the world.

 

Bournemouth aviation museum

Bournemouth aviation museum

Bournemouth aviation museum
Recent addition? 'Help for Heroes'

Bournemouth aviation museum
All that remains of Victor bomber XL164 'Saucy Sal', in Gulf War camouflage. It was scrapped at RAF Brize Norton in 1995. XL164 has its own Facebook page.
A close up of 'Saucy Sal' can be found on my Tumblr page.

Location of the Bournemouth aviation museum, near Hurn
Location of the Bournemouth aviation museum, near Hurn
WEBSITE www.aviation-museum.co.uk

MY INDEX PAGE FOR PRESERVED AIRCRAFT

 

 


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