Please help to solve the mysteries of their identities:

 

One for my Off-Airport Gallery (Latin America) but at time of posting also a candidate for 'Unidentified'..
DC-3 at Charlie's Surf Hostel (Puerto Rico)

The reference book 'Survivors 2017' had no DC-3 listed for Puerto Rico with reference to a hostel.
The cheatline is distinctive. But it seemed my hunch to look ar Puerto Rico was false, it is not one of Four Star that went out of business a few years ago, nor of Air BVI / Aero Virgin Islands.
It seems this location is at the Philippines!
EMAIL?

The adress is Surfer's Road, Brgy. Urbiztondo - 2514 San Juan (La Union).
From Facebook

In Scramble's edition #461 (Oct.2017) I read the following: "On 01Aug2017 'Charlies Hangar Hostel'opened in San Juan, in Northern Philippines.
Centre piece of this backpacker/surfers hostel is a DC-3.
We have not yet been able to identify the DC-3.
An earlier travel blog dated May 2017 shows work in progress with the DC-3 in bare metal up in scaffolding and with several repair patches on the nose.
So the blue colourscheme it has now is not original.
The DC-3 does not have the tail mounted beacon light, which the civil Philippine Daks used to have, making it unlikely that it is one of the DC-3s that were auctioned in late 2014 at Manilla IAP."

 

 

STATUS: SOLVED

In the dec.2016 issue of Scramble magazine I noticed an interesting news bit, and found the mystery here very appealing!

A mystery C-47 at Xiaotangshan Air Museum, ex/ Zimbabwe AF
Screendump from wiki.scramble.nl/index.php/File:Xiaotangshan_sep16_C-47.jpg
Mid-2016 this as yet unidentified ex/ Zimbabwe AF C-47 arrived at the Xiaotangshan Air Museum
Alexandre Avrane offered:"This appears to be in the original Zimbabwe camouflage.
Each C-47 was painted differently so all is needed is a pictures gallery for comparison..."


Apparently this C-47 was bought from the Zimbabwe Air Force in an auction in 2011, crated & shipped to Pakistan (!),  continued overland to Bejing / Xiaotangshan & reassembled and "repainting in full swing.."

Found on www.dc-3.co.za/dc-3-in-africa/zimbabwe.html remarked "Seven ex Air Force of Zimbabwe C-47 Dakotas were put up for auction in September 2011."
The aircraft are all located at Manyame Air Base in Harare, Zimbabwe -17° 55' 45.20", +31° 5' 57.52" click on co-ordinates to open in Google Maps."
And "By July 2014 one of the aircraft had been dismantled and taken away. Details unknown."

At first I thought ZK-AMR (cn11970; see my website) a candidate, but according to ATDB.aero it was scrapped at HRE.
I also have the following Zimbabwe AF C-47's as candidates:
3700 (cn13164),
3708 (cn33138),
7036 (cn 25939),
7053 (cn 32759),
7134 (cn 26437)
VP-YZB (ZimAF 7303, cn25312),
7313 (cn 32741), <---------------
VP-YZG (ZimAF 3708, cn33184),
3711 (cn 12049),
3712 (cn 9492),
VP-YZD (ZimAF 7053, cn33547)


On 20Oct2017 I received a jubilant email sent by John Austin-Williams.
"I have solved the puzzle of the DC-3 / C-47 at the Xiaotangshan Museum, it is 7313!
Looking at the photo you (this email originally adressed to one David McCartney -RL) sent of the one in the China Museum, Xiaotangshan, I noticed that the top of the nose cone is white. And also the cockpit 'Hamburger Door' is white.
It also does not have the two aerial rails on top of the fuselage. There is also a small round white 'unidentified something' just below the right cockpit window...
And I then suddenly recalled I had seen photos of the 7 aircraft and I’ve found them!
C-47 Zimbabwe AF
There was an auction website (www.aaauctionszw.com) where the seven were advertised; an individual web page per aircraft.
At the time I had the foresight to save each page! This auction came to my attention on 01Oct2011, six years ago!
I have compiled the 7 pages into one MS Word document attached.
The last aircraft, 7313, has a white top to the nose cone, no aerial rails on the roof and a small white circle below the right side cockpit window.
C-47 7313 ZimAF
If you compare the camouflage scheme of 7313 to that of the Datangshan example, one sees that the camo scheme is very close!
In actual fact if you look at the other six aircraft they all have no-descript colour scheme – almost all-over beige/brown colour, whereas 7313 has a distinctly obvious camouflage scheme – green and brown.
See this website here www.top-news.top/news-12325153.html
And see also here wiki.scramble.nl/index.php/File:Xiaotangshan_sep16_C-47.jpg
Further more wiki.scramble.nl/index.php/Xiaotangshan_-_China_Aviation_Museum
To me the photographic evidence is highly convincing!
Click the link below – I believe the aircraft is parked here: GPS 40°11'00.7"N 116°21'35.7"E (40.183533, 116.359912) - www.google.co.za/maps/place/...China+Aviation+Museum "
Datangshan - google maps
This issue was initially published on my Photos by Friends & Guests-47
David McCartney also wrote me (Oct.2017): "We have now identified the C-47: it is ex Zimbabwe Air Force, serial 7313, c/n 15993/32741 ex G-AMPS."

And here is a Sep.2017 photo by Grant Newman
C-47 ex/ Zimbabwe AF

Although it was a long time ago, I visited the socalled Datangshan Air Museum, north of Bejing.

 

 

STATUS: SOLVED


Ron mak sent this photo in Oct.2017 and it depicts a visit by Ron to Las Palmas, Gran Canarias, Spain in 1970
DC-3 derelict at Las Palmas in 1970
A Douglas DC-3 derelict at Las Palmas in 1970
Ron wrote: "An unidentified DC-3 at Las Palmas-Gando Airport. I searched for its identity (e.g. Aviation Safety Network and ATDB), but without result. Spantax flew a considerable amount of DC-3's, and a surprising number
found their demise at Tenerife - but I could not find one of theirs ending at Las Palmas..?"

Perhaps it was used as a firetrainer...?
EMAIL

Jürgen Scherbarth wrote (30Oct17): "Suggest that the DC-3 on Ron Mak’s photo shows ex British Westpoint
G-AJHZ, which was scrapped at LPA by that time…
Photos could be found here: https://abpic.co.uk/pictures/registration/G-AJHZ"
The photo further down shows Juergen was correct.

Looked c/n 12421 up in Air-Britain's 'The DC-3, the first 70 Years" and quote the history from where it became EC-ASQ TASSA leased 24May62 to 10Mar64 -- G-AJHZ Trans World Lsng Ltd, Luton reg'd 15Feb65 -- wfu Luton May'66 -- Canx 14Sep66 as 'abroad' -- CoA expired 03Apr67 -- Derelict Lisbon 1968.
--> so if we ignore here "wfu Luton May'66" and "Derelict Lisbon 1968" we have a candidate! And found correct!
The statements 'wfu' and 'derelict' were a little bit unduly. A DC-3 has as much lives as a pussycat, at least!

ATDB c/n 12421
EC-ASQ c/n 12421

Alexandre Avrane (ATDB) added: "G-AJHZ used in Aug.66 in RAF colours for the movie 'Where the Bullets Fly'.
Terry Lee wrote: "I remember 'JHZ very well when with British European Airways (BEA) in the late 50s and early 60s on regular scheduled passenger flights into Birmingham (UK).
She disappeared off the UK register in 1966, believed to Spain."

Juergen sent me an image from his collection, dated Aug.1968:
DC-3 G-AJHZ Westpoint (c/s)

G-AJHZ is in the same position here at Las Palmas as in Ron Mak's photo. Unsolved -> Solved!

 

Gordon Tatro sent me this 03Feb2017; he wrote:"Any ideas about this incident? 
Notice the prop is not bent nor feathered: caused by a ground accident?
Notice the gash in fuselage at wing root? 
Picture taken about 1950-60s.
Notice it is at Logan Airport in Massachusetts: a USAF plane at a civilian airport?
I know the owner of this photo, Peter Waltz, the person standing there is his father, Alden E. Waltz."
C-119 with unexplained damage to engine and wing, at Logan Airport.
The four-bladed prop and double-main wheels make this a C-119, as C-82 had 3-blade props and a single mainwheel.
Purpose of a C-119 visiting Logan Field could be the Air National Guard unit stationed here, e.g. the 101st Tactical Fighter Squadron (TFS; MA ANG).

Peter Waltz wrote:"I know this is my Dad (Alden E. Waltz) because the photo was in an album from my Mom and it was on a page labeled "Alden", and under the photo was written "Al inspecting damage".
What I do not know is what inspecting really means, it may mean he was just looking..?
I am guessing the date of the photo is between 1947 (inclusive) and 1950, as it was in the photo album between my parents wedding photos (01-1947) and some of baby photos of myself (1950-06).

Later on Peter volunteered on the period this photo may have been taken: "As far as the incident date is concerned I now believe my guess of 1949 to 1950 was incorrect as the 317th History shows C-119's were used starting in 1952. See http://www.dyess.af.mil/Portals/145/Docs/AFD-150210-038.pdf

I have no clue what the 10 or the C.D. mean. The C.D. is obviously an abbreviation..?"

EMAIL

Gordon responded to my initial idea of an inflight accident and immediate diversion to Logan:
"Whatever happened to that Boxcar,it happened right there on that spot.
Notice that the blades are not feathered, there is NO tip damage to the blades (prop was still) and notice that there are NO scratch marks on the pavement indicating that the blade tip was NOT dragged (caused by the movement of the plane and the fallen engine).
That is a 4360 Wasp, a heavy engine; there is still much weight being taken to support that engine.
I think some high reach bucket truck fell on the top engine mount, destroying it and the engine then slowly bent downward.
This could not possible be an inflight accident, the plane would have crashed!
Iit almost looks like it was parked there as typical and then the accident occurred There are no fluids on the ground, e.g. oil, fire retardant. It is clean below the engine and that's odd!
And that gash in the fuselage could have been caused by some high reach bucket falling onto the engine and root at wing And then into the fuselage causing the gash.
Notice too that the side of the cowling is wrinkled, that is not much damage for the severity of the engine mount problem!
That little inspection door was left open; whatever occurred was already done and Mr Waltz is sort of looking at it like: "Oh Well...shit happens!"
Why is it not roped off and the wing supported by wing jacks, defueled, etc???"

Photo observations:
I zoomed in on the high resolution version I had scanned, to make these comments.
So, he has on a rather warm coat and gloves, and the hat is typical of one of 2 that he would wear in the winter. The hat on the photo is lined and had ear flaps. The other would be a navy watch cap.
On the opposite side of the aircraft I believe there are 3 trucks, and another person.
Just to the left of the outboard prop blade are what looks to be 3 single vehicle tires, 2 boots, and pant cuffs (a person), and what looks to be a set of dual wheels for a truck. To the right of my dad is another wheel that looks to me to be a truck wheel.
As I zoom in on the prop, it looks like there might be some prop damage on the trailing edge of the prop blade right in front of my Dad’s face.
Next I think that the observation that there was impact from above may correct, as it appears the engine mount strut is intact, and there is sheet metal missing back to the wheel well. The engine cover damage on the top and side would support this idea.
As I zoom in it looks the frame, that the engine mount strut is bolted to, is broken and bent forward.
What I am going to call a bulk head (that all of the lines and wires are going to), in the photo of the not broken engine is about vertical, and it is at about a 45 in the bent engine photo.
If there was impact from the top at an angle towards the fuselage, the prop blade that is by the 'U' could have caused the gash in the fuselage...
This sure is a puzzle!"

Steve Hayes (on WIX/Facebook) offered an interesting theory: "I would guess that something came down on top of the engine, causing it to dislodge and gashing the skin at the fore of the wing root.
It does not appear the engine was running or that there is fire damage.
The parka suggests it may have been cold. Wheels are chocked. Was this a de-icing went bad? Perhaps the lift bucket on a boom coming down on the engine..?"


Peter worked on the unit badge found on this photo (top right corner):
C-119 unit badge?
"This is a blow up and about 15 minutes of playing with the photo tool I have, trying to enhance the image of the unit emblem.
I first cut the section out of the original photo. Then I copied it onto a larger photo space, made a mirror copy. I moved the mirror copy as close as I cold get (my cropping was a little off, hence the white stripe in the middle.
Then I futzed with the image adjustment tools in an attempt to get as much to stand out as I could."

I (Webmaster, RL) checked my bookcase and found in 'United States Military Aviation: The Air Force' (Robert J. Archer, Midland Counties Publications, 1980) in the chapter on Military Airlift Command a page with the badges of 12 MAC Wings and found among them the one for 317th TAW a close match...
Meanwhile Peter did his own research and found a link (http://flightlineinsignia.com/product-category/usaf-insignia/airlift/wings-groups-oss-airlift/page/3/) and provided a coloured image of the same badge:
317th TAW badge
Peter wrote: "The 317th Airlift Grp is out of Dyess Airforce Base in Texas. I e-mailed the Website Manager, and asked to have my e-mail passed on to the 317 AG History Office. We shall see what happens!"
In my book the 317th was part of the 21st Air Force and the 317th Tactical Airlift Wing was based at Pope AFB, North Carolina. At that time (as I said the book was published in 1980) the 317th TAW was equipped with Lockheed C-130E's and flying the 39th Tac Airlift Squadron, the 40th TAS and 41st TAS.

In Alwyn T. Lloyd's book 'Fairchild C-82 Packet and C-119 Flying Boxcar' (AeroFax, Ian Allen Publishing, 2005) I found reference to 317th TCG based in Europe at Rhein-Main AB, West Germany (1952-1953), Neubiberg AB, West Germany (1953-1957) and Evreux-Fauville AB, France (1957-1958).
But we are looking at an event before this European period, as determined from Peter's family album.

This incident ('occurrance') is not listed in the online Aviation Safety Database for Boston (renamed Logan Int'l Airport in 1944): https://aviation-safety.net/database/airport/airport.php?id=BOS
I searched for 'Boston' and 'Logan' on Joe Baugher's webpages www.joebaugher.com/usaf_serials/1946-48.html + 1949 + 1950 and up to 1955 but found nothing relevant to this subject. The production of C-119s ended in 1955.

Peter volunteered on the period the photo may have been taken: "As far as the incident date is concerned I no believe my guess of 1949 to 1950 was incorrect as the 317th History shows C-119's were used starting in 1952. See www.dyess.af.mil/Portals/145/Docs/AFD-150210-038.pdf "

Someone suggested "Hanscom AFB is about 20 miles NW of Logan Field. Is it possible that the guy wearing the Logan Airport coat just happens to be standing at Hanscom AFB when that photo was taken?"
1954-Jul-26: C-119F, 51-8113, 6520FTS, 6520TSG, L G Hanscom Fld, MA, AFCRC, 1, Olsen, Arnold H, USA MA, 20mi N of Boston,MA.
C-119 51-8113
From: www.aviationarchaeology.com/src/dbaloc.asp?Loc=boston&Submit8=Go&offset=75
Note from Webmaster: the person in the photo is a civilian! It is more likely to find a military aircraft at a civilian airport (particulalrly when that airport has an Air National Guard unit based), rather than the other way around..?
Also, would an aircraft damaged as such be repaired?
C-119F 51-8113 (c/n 116) has the following on Joe Baugher's website: 'converted to C-119J in 1955 and to C-119G in 1957. Officially designated C-119J sometime after Jun 1957. To Italian AF in 1964 as MM-8113 with code 46-49.'


Peter Waltz forwarded the email he received in Oct.2017 upon his query
From: Logan Airport <aviationinquiries>
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2017 8:22 AM
Subj: Damaged C 119 at Logan some time between 1952 to 1957
" Good Morning Mr. Waltz: Thank you for your inquiry. We regret that there are no logs or records that we have access to that would shed any light on an incident involving a Fairchild, C-119 aircraft damage.
During that period, the airport was not under the control of the Massachusetts Port Authority.
We might suggest a review of the Boston Globe Archives or else the New England Aviation History website."

 

 

Ulco Kalt went to Texas in 1983 and sent me these images to share and with hopes of identification

Unidentified Big Doug in Texas, in 1983
Ulco wrote me in july 2017 (translation by RL/Webmaster):
"Here are 4 photos which I took, as a young boy, in 1983 during a vacation in Texas. I presume the location is
Brownsville but I am not 100 percent sure... We drove from San Antonio towards the border of van Mexico (El Paso).
So it could very well be Brownsville. The quality of the images are poor, tailnumbers are hard or impossible to read.
I could make out: N320...? And N6110."

DC-3 N6110 in Texas 1983. By Ulco Kalt.
DC-3 N6110 sits on the right. A C-46 in the center and an unidentified type on the far left (same cheatline as C-46?)
The DC-4 may be N3802, last noted registered to Florida Caribbean Airlines, but that company did not operate
DC-3's nor C-46's. So we probably have to look at an owner (not officially reg'd) beyond Florida Caribbean AL.
Alfonso Flores replied on this issue: "That C-46 beside DC-3 N6110 looks as N516AC, impounded in the same
year, 1985, as C-46 N7366N of Air Tram Leassing (see Alfonso's message below) near San Luis Potosí, México."

N6110 is, according ATDB.aero another plane with its fate obscure. Its history: USAF C-47A
(42-23805), Av Q (CU-T3), Nat'l Gypsum Co (N66B), Parker Pen Co (N61A), Rockford Newspapers (N6110, but
also as N6110, w/ FAA reg'd 22Jan1982 for Air-tram Leasing Inc, dereg'd 19Aug1985: exported to Panama).
So this registration to Martin W Thomas (reg'd 26Jul78) as N2020, may never actually took place- fate unknown.
Note the 1983 context in N6110's history and above photo.

Unidentified at Brownsville,TX 1983
This is a mirror image but I have corrected the C-46 on the insert: N7366N?

ATDB.aero has for N7366N the following details:
C-46F c/n 22470, USAF 44-78647, US AL N1914M, Capitol Air N1914M, University of Michigan N7366N,
Century AL NN7366L, Fuerza Aérea Mexicana TEC-6050 (Parted-out, derelict at MMSM-Santa Lucia AB).
On the FAA website I noticed add'l info: Air-tram Leasing Inc., reg'd 25Sep1984 (CofA: 03Dec1979) & dereg'd
24Oct2013 as expired.
It wasn't unusual for the Government of Mexico to register planes after having the ceased for illegal trafficking, make an official Mexican registration. And Air-tram Leasing has that bit of history in common with DC-3 N6110...

Alfonso Flores replied on the C-46s: "The C-46 N7366N (Air Tram Leassing) was ceased in the state of Veracruz, México, in May 1985 during an smuggling flight!
It was fFerried to Mexico City airport by C-46 pilots of the Mexican Air Force and registered as TEC-6050; it flew about 4 years and finally it was scrapped at Santa Lucía Air Force Base in 1993."

About the Douglas DC-4:
Unidentified Big Doug at Brownsville, TX (1983)
N320.. (?) can be read. Or N380.?
So we have here a DC-3 (N6110), a DC-4 and a C-46 (N7366?) plus one unidentified type. At Brownsville?
For suggestions: EMAIL


Ron Mak sent a very food suggestion for the DC-4 soon after me posting this:
DC-4 N3802
Ron wrote (webmaster's translation: "N3802 DC-4 I saw at at Fort Lauderdale on 30Oct1978 and a year later again,
on 27Oct1979, when I took this slide. Seems to fit: a lot of blue (ex/ Nordair?) and the tail looks similar."
Yes, N3802 seems to have the same tail, as if a different tail has been fitted on the fuselage.
Compare nov.1976 and oct.1977 images on Airliners.net. They all show a similar scene: "the left hand outboard
wing on the ground in the very same spot. But it had to be refitted of course, to make it to Texas by 1983.
But the '02' on the nosewheeldoor had been lost by then.

But there are doubts too...
Alexandre Avrane:"I would suggest the DC-4 is N32DR rather than N3802 which wore slight differences in paint.
The lower half of the nose cone is painted differently, reminiscent of its days as an iceberg surveyor; compare with: www.flickr.com/photos/23199966@N02/19572052963
And... N32DR ended at McAllen,TX so another clue which fits!"
Stef Bailis wrote: "I do not think this is the same aircraft. Here are some differences: N3802 does not actually have a radome; it merely is metal with black paint. N320... has a radome (the contours are different).
The blue cheatline of N3802 is thicker than N320...
The cargo doors are very different: N3802 has small door forward, large door aft. N320... has large door forward, small door aft!
The small window (originally for lavatory?) just below the fin is at a different height: N3802 is lower by a few inches than N320...
On my monitor screen, N3802 is 15/32" from the fin, but N320... is only 12/32" from the fin."

So what about N32DR!
C-54B c/n 18357 - USAF 43-17156 -- Northwest AL N95414 -- Flying Tigers 95414 -- Ariana Afghan AL
YA-BAJ -- Pacific Western AL CF-PWA -- Transair CF-TAM -- Kenting Atlas Avn CF-KAD (ice patrol with a special dome atop the cockpit) -- Worldways Canada CF-KAD -- Onyx Avn N32DR -- Scrapped at McAllen-Miller IAP (KMFE),TX [ATDB.aero]



Btw, the DC-3 behind the DC-4 is N48FN (c/n 4306, C-47 of Florida National A/W), later to become N781T
of TolAir Services, to become restaurant Aviones (SJU Barranquitas, along N780T at 18 10 29 N 66 19 54 W).

History of N3802 (c/n 10362): dlvd to USAF (42-72257), Pan American World Airways (N88923), Avianca Colombia (HK-178), Notre-Dame Air Transport (CF-JIR), Wheeler Airlines (CF-JIR), Nordair (CF-JIR), Eastern Provincial A/W (CF-JIR), Florida Caribbean Airlines (N3802; stored) - ultimate fate obscure, suspected drugsrunner...
Well, Brownsville,TX had a reputation for clandestine border trafficking....

 

 

STATUS: SOLVED?

Christian Flaug sent me this in July 2017:
"I found your contact when looking for information on the internet about Beijing Museum, which I visited in August 2016.
I managed to get through most planes and I am wondering if you know further details about these 5 Antonov An-2's, which do not carry a registration.
I am trying to identify them and it does not seem to be easy! I hope you will be able to answer my request.
Many thanks."
Christian

Unidentified An-2, Bejing Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)
Unidentified Antonov An-2, Beijing Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)

A number of Harbin Y-5 / An-2 Colts have been reported here, asper my Datangshan Log Report):
3129 (sighted: Dec03 - olive green, 08Jul04) -- 3139 (Jan00, Feb02, Dec03 - olive green, 08Jul04) -- 7225 (1996, Mar97, Feb02, Dec03 - manufacturer labelled as 'Nanchang', 08Jul04) -- 10996 (Dec03 - olive green, very tatty, 08Jul04 ) -- 60066 (1996 , Mar96, Feb02, Dec03 - olive green, 08Jul04)
And an An-2 floatplane: 21397/10953.
The latter is could be the one above, but Phil's suggestion below contradicts this. However I had no 10997 listed..?

Phil Hawks' suggestions (on Yahoo's Classic-Propliners-forum) here are of great help, a final step would be 'which is which'.
"The Y-5 on floats is 10997 (fitted with the rudder from 21353). It's not a genuine floatplane, BTW - the floats are from something different and have just been added by the museum."
(It certainly shows likeness to John Bennett's 2011 photo (type described as AVIC Y-5). And to Trevor Bartlett's 2016 photo, but '10997, identity not certain'.
"7225 has always been displayed in the tunnel, so if this is still the case, the others must be 3129, 3139, 10996 and 60066. As to which is which, however..."

 

Unidentified An-2, Bejing Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)
Unidentified An-2, Beijing's China Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug).
This one has a '9' on the remaining tailsection, so is 3129 or 3139.
Check John Bennett's https://abpic.co.uk/pictures/view/1337494: which would make it 3129.

Unidentified An-2, Bejing Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)
Unidentified An-2, Beijing's China Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)
So we still have 3139 -- 7225 -- 60066 and 21397 (10953?) to identify among these...

Unidentified An-2, Bejing Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)
Unidentified An-2, Beijing's China Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)

Unidentified An-2, Bejing Aviation Museum (2016, Christian Flaug)
Is this the one described as 'very tatty' (10996) above..?
This one resembles 10996 on John Bennett's https://abpic.co.uk/pictures/view/1337492 for its 'bleached'spots.

'eLaReF' suggested comparison with his Datangshan (2001) folder on Flickr.com
AN02 Datangshan
But the timespan (2001 vs 2016) makes the differences in their wasted states rather difficult.
Btw, the above 10996 seems to have gone even more grey by Trevor Bartlett's 2016 image and suggests
a different An-2 than the ones by Christian : https://abpic.co.uk/pictures/view/1555420

Suggestions welcomed EMAIL [please refer to 'page Search 141' - thank you]

While on the subject of the AN-2, it celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2017!
www.youtube.com

 

 

 

 



Updates & comments welcomed.

EMAIL

 

Created 01-Sep-2017,
Updated 20-Nov-2017